How To Do Budding in Plants

The transfer of a bud from one plant to another is called Budding.You can do budding between different species.The bud of a plant can only be attached to a different plant.During the summer, when the second plant is growing and the bark is healthy, T budding works well.If the second plant’s bark isn’t quite as “live”, chip budding can be used during the spring or early fall.

Step 1: A budstick can be cut from its source.

Search for buds growing along the original plant.On the outside of the scion’s canopy, look for branches that are still growing away from the stem.Where leaf stems grow from the branch, look for buds that are fat and healthy.Remove any leaves from the branch.When cutting the leaves, make your cut at the base of the blades so that the stem is still attached to the branch.The buds of one plant may look different from another.Images and descriptions of the plant that you are budding can be found online.Before you start, make sure your plant is capable of budding.Some plants will only accept certain types of plants while others will not.

Step 2: It’s a good idea to have a bud shield.

The leaf stem is pointing away from you if you hold the bud stick.To cut below the stem’s base, use a sharp knife.Put the bud stick in the leaf stem.If you want your blade to come out a half-inch above the stem, you have to curve it into the wood.If you want to use the leaf stem as a handle, you should use a piece of wood that is called a bud shield.Remove the blade from the budstick just before it breaks the surface on its way out to make sure it doesn’t fly.If you want to cross a “T” along the top of your original cut, slice a half-inch above the stem.You can do I-budding, where you cut a capital “I” with one horizontal cut at each end of the vertical cut.The cuts should be smooth.The wood won’t be successful with the new plant if you rough sawing it.

Step 3: The plant has a T-cut.

The root stock is a smooth spot on the stem of the plant.The vertical cut should be done along the stem.It should be the same size as the bud shield.You can either make a horizontal cut along the top or the bottom of the vertical cut.Excess water will be allowed to drain from the root stock more efficiently.

Step 4: A pocket is created.

Take the bark away from the T-cut.The vertical and horizontal cuts meet in the inside corners.To expose a triangle of the plant’s tissue, peel outward.Don’t tear the bark off the stem.The root stock may not have fully recovered from its winter dormancy if the bark resists peeling.Wait until the cycle is over.The height of summer is when this occurs.

Step 5: If necessary, trim the bud shield.

The bud shield should be held by the leaf stem.Line it up with the root stock cut.The bud shield should be placed against the root stock.If the root stock’s horizontal cut is higher than the top of the wood shaving, cut off the extra wood so that it doesn’t stick out.

Step 6: The bud shield should be moved to the root stock.

Line the two up once the bud shield lines up perfectly with the root stock.To cover the bud shield, smooth the two flaps of bark.The bud shield’s leaf stem and bud are exposed because of the wind grafting tape around the root stock.Remove the tape after the plant heals for two to three weeks.If you want to encourage growth from the scion bud, trim the root stock above the bud shield.Budding rubbers can be used instead of tape.

Step 7: There is a budstick on the scion plant.

There are buds still growing on the outside of the original plant.In the crooks where leaf stems grow from the branches, look for buds that are fat and healthy.Cut the branch from the original plant and then remove the leaf blades.Your budstick is the cut branch.The leaf stem should not be cut.You can hold your chip without disturbing the bud.The buds of one plant may look different from another.Images and descriptions of the plant that you are budding can be found online.

Step 8: You should make your cuts.

The blade should be positioned along the budstick, about a half-inch below the leaf stem.At an angle of roughly 50 degrees, slice downward into the budstick.The cut should be an eighth of an inch deep.Place your knife three-quarters of an inch above your first cut, with the bud and leaf stem between the two, to perform your second cut.It should be positioned along the branch.If you want the blade to connect with your first cut, slice downward into the wood.Pull the chip out of the scion by its leaf stem once the cut is made.Depending on the size of your plant and its buds, you may need to vary the depth and length of the two cuts.

Step 9: The root stock has a pocket.

The root stock is a smooth area on the stem of the plant.The same cutting technique can be used to create a pocket for your chip.If possible, make it the same size and shape as your chip so that one fits into the other perfectly.Because you don’t need to peel live bark to make your pocket, this technique can be used before and after summer.

Step 10: Donate your chip.

The root stock has a chip in it.There is tape around the graft.The bud and stem should be covered.It is a greater risk with chip budding if it is sealed tightly.Remove the tape after the plant heals for two to three weeks.To encourage growth from the scion bud, trim the root stock above the chip.If the chip is smaller than the pocket, line up as many sides of the chips as possible with the corresponding edges.Wait until winter to trim the root stock if it’s too late in the season to expect growth.

Step 11: A budstick is from a scion plant.

There are branches growing on the outside of the canopy.There are buds where the leaf stems meet the branches.Cut the branch from the plant.Cut the leaves from the top of the stems.A budstick is what you have left.If you want to hold your patch, you need to remove the leaf’s blades and leave the stem.Images and descriptions of the plant that you are budding can be found online.

Step 12: You need to cut out your patches.

A horizontal slice along the budstick is the first thing to do.Make a parallel slice of equal length about a half-inch below the bud.The third vertical slice should be performed from the end of one horizontal cut to the other.To connect the other two ends of the horizontal lines, make a second vertical slice.Carefully remove the bark from the branch.Next, look for a smooth stretch along the stem of the root stock.To remove a rectangular patch of equal size, use the same cutting technique.The I-budding method is very similar.You make the same cuts, but the first one is not horizontal.One vertical line and two horizontal lines should be cut.The cut will look like a capital I.

Step 13: Wrap your patch with something.

The root stock has an open patch.Line the sides of each one up.If you want to leave the bud and leaf stem exposed, use budding rubber to secure the patches.Allow the plant to heal for two to three weeks.If you used grafting tape, remove it since it doesn’t break down naturally.To encourage growth from the scion bud, trim the root stock above the patch.Wait until winter to trim the root stock if it’s too late in the season to expect growth.